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U . V \ 



<^^hll^rSi 



COLLEGE 




A EW3. 




Vol. 3. No. 2. 



WELLESLEY, MASS., WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1903 



Price, 5 Cents 



THE FIRST BARNSWALLOWS. 



Saturday evening, September :?<>, was 
the occasion of the annual Barnswallow 
reception to the new students. By half- 
past seven it seemed as if every one in col- 
lege must have arrived, but people con- 
tinued to conn- for a half hour. The guests 
were formally received by Miss Ruth Hart, 
president of the Barnswallows, Mrs. Du- 
rant and Miss Pendleton. Miss Hazard 
was unable to be present. 

When everyone had been introduced, 
Miss Hart welcomed the past and the fu- 
ture members of the Barnswallows. She 
spoke of the pleasure and benefit to be de- 
rived from membership in this organization 
and urged all to join. Miss Hart's 

speech received hearty applause. Mrs. 
Duiant and Miss Pendleton spoke enthu- 
siastical 1 -- of the Bamst -allow evenings 
advising us to mingle play and work. 

After the speeches, the orchestra struck 
up and the promenades began. A few 
courageous spirits danced in the center of 
the floor, but the majority preferred to get 
about the room with less difficult ma- 
in euvcring. The night was mild and beau- 
tiful and many left the crowded room to 
wander about out-doors. A new and very 
successful plan was arranged for the meet- 
ing of partners. The letters of the alpha- 
bet, on large pieces of cardboard, were 
tacked up in order around the room. At 
the end of each promenade, each Fresh- 
man was left near the letter beginning her 
last name. As all the Freshmen had 
their names pinned on in plain sight, it 
was comparatively easy to find partners. 
The new method is a great improvement 
on the old. 

The lights went out, as they do so often, 
before we were half through the program, 
— we never are quite ready to leave the 
Barn. Judging by the number who at- 
tended and by the pleasant things which 
were said, the evening was a real success, 
and we are glad to look forward to the 
good times in store for us as Barnswallows 
this year. 

THE FRESHMAN CONCERT. 

The first in the series of College con- 
certs for the year, known as the Fresh- 
man concert, was given in College Hall 
Chapel, Monday evening, September 2S. 
The Freshman Concert was given for the 
first time last September, but the success 
of last year, more than equalled this year, 
proves that this first concert is an occasion 
of much pleasure to upper-class students 
as well as to Freshmen. The program for 
the concert this year was unusually at- 



tractive, consisting of numbers by the 
Albion Quartette, already well-known to 
Wellcsley students, and by Mr. Jacques 
Hoffman, who has won the admiration of 
the students through his delightful playing. 
The program was a musical treat through- 
out and the numbers were all so good that 
to make distinction were difficult. The 
"Theresa Waltzes," given by the Quar- 
tette in the first group of songs were full of 
charming rhythm and called forth as an 
encore a beautiful evening-song. Mr. 
Babcock's "I am a Roamer," was espe- 
cially fitted to show off the powerful and 
rich quality of his voice, and Mr. Bartlett 
in rendering his own composition, "The 
Dream," met with an ovation. Mr. Hoff- 
man's playing as always was a delight; his 
Concerto from Bruch was a beautiful piece 
of work, and especially skilfully and ex- 
quisitely rendered were his "L'Abeille" 
and the encore to his Concerto. 

The program for the concert was as 
follows : 

PROGRAMME. 

1. Quartettes. 

March Becker 

In Picardie Osgood 

Theresa Waltzes . . Faust-Penschel 

2. Solos for Tenor. 

Absence Little 

The Willow Thomas 

Mr. J. C. Bartlett. 

3. ' Solo for Violin. 

Introduction and Adagio from 

Concerto in G minor. . . M. Bruch 

4. Solos for Bass. 

At the Forge Brahms 

"I am a Roamer" Mendelssohn 

Mr. D. Marks Babcock. 

5. Solos for Violin. 

Parsifal Paraphrase 

Wagner-Wilhelmi 
Nocturne in E flat . . Chopin-Sarasate 
L'Abeille Francois Schubert 

6. Quartette. 

The Cheerful Wanderer, Mendelssohn 

Serenade Billeter 

Sunset Van De Water 



THE NOANETT. 

Now that it is finished, the new dormi- 
tory in the Village meets with general ap- 
proval. The halls are artistically dec- 
orated in red and green, the reception 
rooms in white and green. In the main 
hall there is a large and comfortable fire- 



place. The dining room is an especially 
pleasant room because of its west, south 
and east exposures. The bedrooms are 
daintily papered and artistically fur- 
nished in weathered oak. 

Aside from the artistic the new dormi- 
tory meets all other requirements; the 
plumbing is all open and is designed ac- 
cording to the best hygienic theories. The 
building is lighted both by gas and elec- 
tricity. 

Noanett, the name given to the build- 
ing, is that of an English Royalist who 
masqueraded for many years as an Indian 
chieftain. His tribe roamed about this 
section of Massachusetts for a long time. 
Mr. F. G. Stimpson of Dedham has written 
a book. "King Noanett," giving the ex- 
ploits of this man. 

The name is pronounced with the ac- 
cent oil the first syllable. 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF PRIZES. 

The editors are requested to reprint the 
following notice which appeared in The 
News last spring. 

Believing that the best stories and 
plays of which Wellesley undergraduates 
are capable are still to be written and de- 
siring to see such work seriously under- 
taken, the Legenda Board of the class of 
'96 hereby offers two competitive prizes 
amounting to fifty dollars for the best 
plays or stories submitted to its committee 
of judges, under such conditions as that 
committee shall hereafter announce. No 
manuscript is to be submitted earlier 
than May 20, 1904. One prize is to be 
offered to next year's Freshman class. 
Associate Professor Hart is chairman of 
the Committee of Judges. Announce- 
ment will be made shortly of the other 
judges. L 



SENIOR ELECTION. 



At a meeting of the class of nineteen 
hundred and four, October 2, the follow- 
ing officers were elected. 

Vice-President Ann Orr 

Recording Secretary Faith Talcott 

Corresponding Secretary . . . .Elsie Appel 

Treasurer Maude Jessup 

("Elizabeth Taylor 

Executive Committee -! Mary Follett 

I Anna Scott 

„ . f Jane Lennox 

Factotums \ L J UCY p R0CT0R 



COLLEGE NEWS 



CollegeJRews- 

Press of N. A. Lindsiy & Co., Boston. 



Published weekly. Subscription price, 75 cents 
a year to resilient subscribers; $1.00 per year to 
non-resident subscribers. 

All business correspondence should be ad- 
dressed to C. W. ROGERS. Business Editor COL- 
LEGE News, Welleslcy, Mass. 



Editor-in-Chief, Carolyn P. Nelson, 1905. 
Associate Editor, Helen R. Norton, 1905. 
Literary Editors, 
Roxana Vivian Mabel Seagrave, 1905 

Mary Esther Chase, '95 Ellen Manchester, 1905 

Jessie Gidley. 1906 
Managing Editors, 
Annie V. Luff, 1904 
Cora L. Butler, 1904 Edith Fox, 1904 

Assistant Business Manager, Edith Fox. 



EFFICIENT 

Our Glasses arc models of Efficiency 

Better glasses are almost a practical 
impossibility. 

U B PRICES A K E M O 1> B KATE 

Pinkham & Smith, 

OPTICIANS, 

288 Boylston Street, Boston. 



Most of us, all of us, perhaps, have come 
to College this year with many gilt-edged 
resolutions, and may we be able to keep 
at least a few of them ! We would recom- 
mend that one resolution be made which 
perhaps has not occurred to some of us. 

We remember the proverb concerning 
people who live in glass houses, but we 
are willing to sacrifice ourselves and suffer 
the gibes and taunts of those who know our 
own shortcomings for the sake of furthering 
a possible reform. The subject of this ser- 
mon is Punctuality; the resolution to be 
drawn therefrom is obvious. In general, 
we meet our class opportunities with 
reasonable punctuality, but there are 
innumerable engagements which we do 
not meet promptly. 

jfc»Why is it that Student Government 
and class meetings can never begin before 
four-thirty when the time is invariably 
set for four-fifteen ? There is a deplorable 
lack of punctuality on the athletic field, at 
chapel, in all social engagements, large 
and small. Our inexcusable tardiness 
often causes others great annoyance, 
sometimes resulting in really serious de- 
lays which in most cases might easily have 
been avoided by a little thought and 
planning. It is a certain carelessness and 
lazy self-indulgence that makes us put off 
things that can be postponed for a shorter 
or longer time without seriously interfering 
with our own plans . 

It is significant and also humiliating 
to notice that the girls who live in the 
Village are more punctual, as a rule, than 
those on the Campus. Unless the Village 
girls plan their time carefully, they can- 
not meet the various appointments of the 



day and yet we often find them waiting 
for the girls who live on the grounds. 

Aside from the inconvenience and an- 
noyance which tardiness causes in our col- 
lege life, the habit is a vicious one and sure 
to make us trouble later on. In business 
life punctuality in all things is one of the 
cardinal virtues, and it contributes incal- 
culably to success in any serious work. A 
prompt, business-like attitude toward 
work is recognized and lauded the world 
over. Finally, brethren, it is easier in the 
end and certainly very much pleasanter to 
meet obligations at the proper time in the 
proper way than to wait until apologies 
and explanations are necessary. 

We have said our say; now let those 
whom the coat fits, put it on. 

At a recent meeting of the Southern 
Club the following officers were elected : 

President, Julia Tyler. Vice-Presi- 
dent, Sue Schoolfield. Secretary, Lallie 
Joe Moody. Treasurer, Myra Foster. 



BOSTON REPRESENTATIVE 
Forsythe's Waists, 

Belts, Stocks, 

In our Ladies' Department will be found a 
full assorment of Neckwear, Gloves and Col- 
lars, mannish styles, Imported Hand Made 
French Hosiery, in silk and lisle. 

F. W. B SELLORS & CO., 

172Tremont St., Boston. 



THIS SPACE RESERVED 

— FO R — 

The East India Co., 

Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 

MISS McCHARLES, 

Corner Boylston and Berkeley. 

229 Berkeley Street, Boston, Mass. 

GOWNS FOR COLLEGE WEAR. 

Reasonable Prices. 



It's a FOWNES 



That's all you 
need to know about 
a glove 



At a meeting of the Philosophy Club, 
October 2d, the following officers were 
elected: 

President Louise Hunter 

Vice-President Miss Calkins 

Secretary Helen Cook 



All articles for the College News should 
be in the hands of the editorial board by 
Friday noon Of each week — 
College Notes | Mabel Seagrave 

Parliament of Fools I 

Alumnae Notes Miss Vivian 

Free Press Helen Norton 

Society Notes Ellen Manchester 



"The pleasantest things in the world are 
pleasant thoughts and the great art in life is 
to have as many of them as possible. — Bov^e. 

What is more conducive to pleasant 
thoughts than a 

Beautiful Picture 
Well Framed? 

FRANK J. POPE, 

314 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 

Opposite Arlington Street. 



PHOTOS 

In Platinum, Carbon, Carbonette. Photog- 
rapher to Wellesley, '94, '95 and '03. 

THE HEARN STUDIO, 

C- W- Hearn, 349 Boylston St , Boston. 
Personal attention to all sittings. 



DOWSLEY & LAFFEE, 
High Class Hillinery, 

168 Tremont St., Boston, Mass. 
Discount to Wellesley Students and Faculty. 



SAVES HOSIERY 



NEVER SLIPS, TEARS 
NOR UNFASTENS 

Every Pair 

Warra 

The 




HOSE 
SUPPORTER 

If your Dealer does not sell you this 
Supporter he does not sell the Best 



GEORGE FROST CO., Makers, Boston, Mass. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



COLLEGE CALENDAR. 



Pari 



( Ictober 6 8, i to 6 1' M , reception in the Facull ] 

new students, held by the Presidi n1 and I lean 
i )ctobcr s, 7 30 P. M . midweek prayer meeting. 
October it, 11.00 A. M., services in Houghton Memorial Chapel 

Sermon by Prof, George II Palmer of Harvard University. 

7.30 I'. M . vespers with special music. 
October 1 .:. 3 i" '1 I'. M . reception in the Faculty Parlor for the 

Freshmen, given by the Seniors. 

COLLEGE NOTES. 

The proprietors of the Wellesley Inn are adding a new wing 
io the easl end of the building. The chief aim of this addition 
is to enlarge the dining-room. The managers expect, when the 
addition is completed, to be able to accommodate one hundred 
and fifty people at one sitting. 

On Tuesday, October thirteenth, the Faculty Science Club 
will hold a meeting at the Observatory. Dr. Roberts will 
present a paper on "The Action of Magnesium on Aqueous So- 
lutions." 

Miss Clarissa Hastings. 1004. has announced her engagement 
to Mr. Robert Chapman, Jr., of Newtonville, Mass. 

A lunch room is soon to be opened on the first floor of College 
Hall, where village students may secure hot soup, chocolate, 
milk, etc.. to supplement their cold lunches. Although in- 
tended primarily for those who do not live on the Campus, the 
lunch room will be open to all students. 

Miss Rowena Campbell, Miss Marian Bosworth and Miss Alice 
Haddon have returned to College. 

The Student Government Association has its office in Room 
2 7 B. The Association needs a nice desk and chairs for the office. 
An)' one who will give these articles, or money to purchase them, 
will please inform one of the officers of the Association at once. 

Miss Elsie Newton, 1904, who has been at the Baptist Hospi- 
tal in Roxbury all summer, is greatly improved and has re- 
turned to College. 

Miss Marion Hubbard, associate professor of Biology, has 
begun her graduate work at Chicago University. 

Miss Abbie Turner, one of the new instructors in the Zoology 
Department, is a graduate of Mount Holyoke, and has done 
graduate work in the University of Pennsylvania and the Uni- 
versity of Chicago. Miss Turner has taught in Northfield Sem- 
inary and at Mount Holyoke. 

Miss White, formerly resident nurse, is in New York City. 
Miss Geneve C. Hall from Dr. Weir Mitchell's hospital in Phila- 
delphia, has taken her place. 

At a meeting of the class of nineteen hundred and six, held 
September 30, Miss Jessie Gidley was elected Sophomore mem- 
ber of the College News Board. 

The College was very fortunate to have Dr. Julia Bissell at 
the Vesper Service, Sunday, October 4. 



Shoes for College Girls 

i^iiii unci Winter Styles In nil 
l^cjiitlicM-M now i-cjiicly. 

Wc iit-o solo Bi).ston Agents for 

"La France" S3.00 Shoes, 
Thayer, Rogers & Norton, 

144 Tremont Street, Boston. 



LUNCHEON. 
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445 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass. 

Everything we serve in our Dining Room is the choicest and beat 
that can be bought, regardless of price. 



FINEST Passenger Train service over 
the only "Double Track" Route be- 
tween Boston, Albany and the west. 

A.. S. MA.INSOIN, 

General Passenger Agent. 




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JEWELERS AND SILVERSMITHS, 



BOSTON 



FINE STATIONERY, UMBRELLAS, PARASOLS. 
WEDDING GIFTS. 
OFFICIAL MAKERS OF THE WELLESLEY SEAL PINS. 
FINE JEWELRY REPAIRING. 



Every Requisite for a 



2)aint£ Xunch 



at 



COBB, BATES & YERXA CO., 

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( Only one block from Washington St.) 



CLEAN-TO-HANDLE. CLEAN-TO-CARRY. 

MOORE'S NON-LEAKABLE FOUNTAIN PEN. 



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Designs from the most elaborate gold chased barrel to the modest plain rubber. 
All pens shipped filled ready to use. 

AMERICA1N FOUINTAIIN F>EIN COrvlPAINY, 

168 Devonshire Street, __------- Boston, Mass. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



FREE PRESS. 



I. 

Though there are very many things that the girls who went 
last summer to the Christian Association Conference at Silver 
Bay on Lake George, want to talk about and do, there is one 
especially about which we cannot longer keep silent, that is 
the plan of having in otir College a general secretary of the 
Christian Association. 

The idea is doubtless a new one to many of us, as indeed it 
was to some of the girls at the conference; a little explanation 
of the dvities and use of a General Secretary might therefore be 
fitting. In an Association as large as ours it is exceedingly hard 
to secure through it a benefit to each of its members because it 
is well nigh impossible for girls whose time is taken by academic 
work and the many other college interests to devote the neces- 
sary time to the welfare of the Association. It was the realiza- 
tion of this inadequacy that first led vis to consider having a 
secretary; and the knowledge of the success of the general sec- 
retaries in other colleges has kept up our enthusiasm and height- 
ened it. Of the colleges in which conditions are most similar 
to our own, Mt. Holyoke and Smith, both have general secre- 
taries of the Christian Association and not only the girls are en- 
thusiastic, but President Wooley of Mt. Holyoke is most hearty 
in her praise of the secretary's work and in her recommendation 
that the Wellesley Association try this plan. The secretary 
would be a college graduate, either of Wellesley or some other 
college, and would receive a salary from the Association. She 
would give her entire time to the Christian Association work; 
and to accomplish the best results she would necessarily not do 
.the work herself but would rather plan work for many more 
girls than are now active, and would broaden the Association 
interests in so doing. 

Each member wants our Christian Association to mean more 
to her in Christian fellowship than it has ever meant before. 
And if we may rely upon the judgment and experience of those 
who are pre-eminently fitted to know, we must feel that one of 
.the surest ways to bring this about is through securing a general 
secretary. 

As an evidence of the enthusiasm of the Silver Bay delegation 
on this subject it is necessary only to say that the thirty pledges 
which girls at Silver Bay made toward the secretary's salary 
(if the Association voted to have a secretary this year) amounted 
to two hundred and fifty-six dollars. That, we feel, shows how 
much those who have thought of the question a great deal favor 
having a general secretary of the Christian Association. 

We are very anxious to have the matter thought about and 
talked over carefully among all members of the Association 
before it is discussed formally at a business meeting. Any one 
of the girls who went to Silver Bay will be glad to explain about 
the Secretary's work and our need for her; the Free Press, too, 
is an excellent way to give the College your thought about this 
question. Mary P. Eaton. 

II. 

Aren't we, as college students, in our visits to the Village, 
sometimes most thoughtless of the impression made by our con- 
duct? 

We forget where we are, and go along the street talking loudly, 
and laughing even boisteriously, perhaps eating an apple, or 
indulging in a cracker. No doubt it is only a careless expres- 
sion of relief that lessons are over for the day, and that now it 
is playtime. This fact may excuse our hilarity to other college 
girls, but cannot and does not excuse such conduct to outsiders, 
or to people living in the Village. Consequently, a false estima- 
tion is made of the Wellesley College girl. At home, in public 
places, we would not think of disregarding all conventional 
restraint, why should we then in the streets of Wellesley Village? 
I am sure each one of us, who has thus indulged her light- 
hearted feelings has been conscious of doing not just the right 
thing. Perhaps this added a little zest to the fun. 

But girls, pride for Wellesley is deep in our hearts, and if we 
but pause a moment, I am sure we shall not wish to do ourselves, 
or to tolerate in others, what cannot but reflect upon our College. 



MOCHA AND JAVA COFFEE, 
1 lb. and 2 lb Cans. 



PREFERRED STOCK 

The Highest Grade Coffee. 

MARTIN L. HALL& CO., BOSTON 
Beef and Supply Co., 

38 and 40 Faneuil Hall Market, 
Tel. 933 Richmond. BOSTON. 



STICKNEY & SMITH, 

157 Tremont Street, Boston, 

Allow 10 per cent, discount to 
Teachers and Pupils of Welles- 
ley College on 

Ladies' Costumes, 
Street, Walking Suits, 
Skirts and Garments 

of All Kinds, 

Waists and Furs, 

( OUR ONLY STORE.) 




Frederic Forehand, 
Proprietor 

antique ^furniture 
and Historical Cbina 

390 BOYLSTON STREET 
Boston, Mass. 



C O I, L E G e n i<: w S 



RESOLUTIONS. 

Where is, the circle ol the .'lass of [903 was broken on Augu 1 
1, uio.i, !>v the loss "i om "i it! nn mben Minnii Edith Ltisk, 
whose loyalty, service and friendship an held in grateful n 
membrance by her classmates, 

Be it Resoi ved, thai the class of 1903 hereby express its deep 
sorrow ;it her death ami its earnesl sympathy in the grief which 
her l"ss causes t<> her family ami friends. 

,\m. hi. 11 Further Resolved, thai these resolutions 1><- 
senl in her family, an. I that they be published in the College 
News of Wellesley College. Signed: 

Si san Belle Ai nslie, 
Mauv Beltzhoover Jenkins. 
Mary Howell Haines. 

For the class of 1 903. 
September 1903. 



SOCIETY NOTES. 



At a regular meeting of the Shakespeare Society held Saturday 
evening, October 3, the following . persons were received into 
membership, Florence McCormick, '05, Olive Chapman, '05, 
Olive Hunter, '06, Elsie Goddard, '06, Elsie Pitkin, '06, Caroline 
Singleton, '06, Martha Hughes, '06, Edna Moore, '06, Helen 
Edwards, '06. Marion Stephenson, '06, Laura Dwight,'o6, Connie 
Guion, '06, Gertrude Ware, '06, Charlotte Thomas, '06, Louise 
Steele, '06, Marion Carlisle, '06. The program for the evening 
consisted of scenes from "Romeo and Juliet." 
[' ! '■ Act II. Scene IV. 

Benvolio Madeleine Steele 

Mercutio Ruth Hart 

Romeo Jeanette Kelly 

Peter Ida Kitchen 

Nurse Maud Arnold 

Act II. Scene V. 

Juliet Edna Summy 

Nurse Alice Stockwell 

Peter Ida Kitchen 

Act III . Scene V. 

Juliet Elizabeth Marston 

Romeo Jeanette Kelly- 
Nurse Alice Stockwell 

Mrs. Prince, Miss Hunt, Miss Adams, Miss Boroman, Miss 
Davis, Miss Blattner, Miss A. Spink, Miss Conklin, Miss Hicks, 
Miss H . Page and Miss Buhlert were present. 

At a formal meeting of the Society Tau Zeta Epsilon held in 
the Chapter House, Sattirday evening, October 3, the following 
were received into membership. Laura Hibbard, '05, 

Helen Elliot. '06, Emily Freeman, '06, Alice Heber, '06, Laura 
Maltby. '06, Helen White, '06. Ora Williams, '06. Mabel Wal- 
dron, '06, Ella Mac Kinnon, '06. 

LITERARY NOTE. 

The Craftsman, in its October issue, enters upon the third 
year of a successful existence. It's leading article upon L'Art 
Nouveau is from the pen of S. Bing, in whose studios in the rue 
de Provence, Paris, the modern movement received its first im- 
petus and its name. 

Another article of great interest is "The Halo in Art," by 
Caryl Coleman, which, owing to late arrival, could not be pro- 
duced in September. 

Irene Sargent continues the Craftsman Ceramic Series with an 
account of the Newcomb Pottery. 

"The Use of Wood in Switzerland," is the title of finely illus- 
trated paper by Wendell G. Corthell. 

The recently added department devoted to the Nursery con- 
tains original designs for paper wall-hangings made with special 
reference to the pleasure and instruction of children , and] the 
Needlework Section gives illustrations of cross-stitch, lace-mak- 
ing and tapestries. 



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Modern in Every Detail. 

Restaurant for Ladies. Entrance on Boylston Street. 
JOHN A. SHERLOCK. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



HIGH 

GRADE 

FURS 



Established 1858. 

Edw. Kakas & Sons, 

162 Tremont Street. 

DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS. 



loWNE/5 



CHOCOLATES 

SO and 60c per lb. 



DELICIOUS— DAINTY-PURE. 

146 Washington St., ( 4th door North of Summer St. ) 



PICTURES FRAMED 

— AT — 

Mrs. H. E. Curriers' 

Grove Street, Wellesley. 

Edward E. Henry, D.M.D. 

(Grad. Harvard Univ. Dental School) 

Shattuck's Block, . Wellesley. 
Hours 9.12 and 2-5- 

SMITH BROTHERS, 

Butter, Cheese & Eggs, 

2 and 4 New Faneuil Hall 

Market, 

BOSTON, MASS. 

Sole Receivers of Randolph Cream- 
ery- 

MARY L. MORAN, 
Dressmaking, 

Shaw Building, Wellesley, Mass. 
latest Fastyiops, 

GEO. P. RAYMOND CO. 

Costume Parlors, 

17 Boylston Place, Boston 

Costumes tor private theatricals 
and Costume parties. 

John A. Morgan b\ Co. 

PHARMACISTS, 

Shattuck Building, Wellesley, Mass. 

"Tom" Griffin, ™ LL s E T sL EY 

Carriages at Station on arrival of all trains. 

Reliable Horses anil Carriages To Let. 

Personal Attention to all orders 
for evening trains. Order box at 
North Door of College Hall. 

BAGGAGE TKANSFERBED. 

TELEPHONE 101-5. 

H. L. LAWRENCE CO. 

Poultry, Wild Game, 

Stalls 46 & 48 Faneuil Hall 

Market, 

BOSTON. 

F. DIEHL. & SON, 

Dealers in 

Coal, Wood, Hay & Grain, 

Wellesley, Mass. 
Telephone No. 16-4. 



THE PARLIAMENT OF FOOLS. 



THE RULING FASHION. 
I put it to you plainly — 

What shall Alumna:' do. 
Who come back here to Wellesley 

And contemplate that new 
And beauteous dormitory 

Presented to our view ? 

Most things we know the name of, — 

But watch us get upset 
When one girl blandly tells us — 

"Oh, that's the Noanett." 
Then another village Freshman 

Who acts as if she ran it, 
Tells us how pleased she is to live 

Down at the new Noanett. 
That dazed, we ask a third girl's aid, 

'Tis marvel she would deign it, — 
"Why, everybody knows that house,- 

I board there, — the Noanett!" 

Ouery: When Freshmen disagree, 
Who shall decide it ? 



ALUMNA NOTES. 



Miss Dora Delia Stoker, 1903, is to teach English this year in 
the High School, Topeka, Kansas. 

Miss Jessie S. Goodwin, 1903, has accepted a position in the 
Franklin, N. H., High School. 

On June 27, Misses Elizabeth, Anna and Jessica Braley sailed 
for Naples to spend the summer abroad. 

Mrs. Ada Wing Mead, '87, sailed on July 2, for a summer in 
England and on the continent with her husband. 

Miss Mary C. Walker, '83, spent the summer in Europe. Miss 
Walker is president of the Louisana State W. C. T. XL, and was 
a delegate to the World's W. C. T. U. convention in Geneva, 
Switzerland. 

An article by Dr. Charlotte F. Roberts, '80, and Miss Louise 
Bnwn, '93, entitled "The Action of Metallic Magnesium upon 
Aqueous Solutions" appeared in the August number of the 
Journal of the American Chemical Society. The experiments 
described in the article were made in the Wellesley laboratory. 

Miss Helen A. Merrill, '86. who took the degree of Ph. D., at 
Yale University in June, has returned to College. Dr. Merrill 
has been working on Differential Equations and presented a 
paper on the subject at the summer meeting of the American 
Mathematical Society. The results of her investigations are to 
be published in an early number of the Transactions of the 
Society. 




Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume 

Chartered 1902. 
COTRELL, & LEONARD, Albany, N. Y. 

Makers of the Caps, Gowns and 

Hoods to the American Colleges 

and Universities. 



Illustrated Bulletins 



nple 



3lanks 






B. A., 
M. A., 
Ph. D. 



Annie W. Stocking, (Wellesley '02) in charge of 
correspondence, may be addressed as above. 
WELLESLEY AND OTHER HOODS. 

$3.50 to $ 8.50; desirable, $ 5.50 
6.75 " 16.50; " 10.50 

8.50 " 22.00; " 13.50 



R. H. PORTER, 

Plumber. 

TIN AND SHEET IRON WORK 

loot Water ano Steam JHeaters, 

Beater in Stoves, IRanges, THarfcwarc, 

lpainta, Oils, Ete. 

Wellesley, IVIass. 



Established 1875. 

Chas. E. Shattuck, 
GROCER, 

Wellesley Square. 



Qassius (I). Hall, 

Successor to A. B. Clark, 

THE GROCER, 

Washington St., Wellesley. 



B. S. COLE, 

Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Poultry 
and Game, 

Wholesale and Retail. 
Stalls 1 3 & 1 5 Faneuil Hall Market 

Tel. Connection. BOSTON 



F. A. Coolidge & Co., 

Dealers in 

Choice Meats & Provisions 

Washington St., Wellesley. 

J. TAILBY & SON, 
FLORISTS, 

Wellesley, Opp. R. R. Station 

Orders by mail or otherwise 
promptly attended to. Con- 
nected by Telephone. 

HOLDEN'S STUDIO 

20 No. Ave., Natick, 
HIGH GRADE PORTRAITS. 

Connected by Telephone. 

LADIES' DESKS, 

MORRIS CHAIRS, 
Filled Screens, Bamboo Tea 
Tables and Bookshelves. 

College Souvenir China. 
CLELAND & UNDERWOOD, 

7 TO 13 W. CENTRAL ST., NATICK. 
Free Delivery. 

FALL OPENING 

-OF— 

French Pattern Hats, 

In all the Latest Designs, also 
a good line of Fine Neckwear. 

Miss H. W. Murray, 

tUUUealev! So,., THHelIcsIes, flDasa. 



C O L I, E G E N E W S 



ALUMNA NOTES. 

Deacon and Mrs. Wilson oi Naticl have recently pn 1 

in the College libran a small volume containing memorial 
iketche; ol then daughter, Nell) Frances Wilson, who was or- 
merlyan instructor in the dcpartmenl of English Literature. 

Miss Nurella E, Phipps, mo,;, has been appointed assistai 

the High School at Westboro, Mass. 

Miss Lillian II. Bruce, moi. is Assistant Secretary ami Physi 
cal Director ol the Y \l C. A.., in Binghampton, N. Y 

Miss Ruby E. Warfield, 1903, is to teach in the State Normal 
School, Johnson, Vet 1 1 

Mary Haskell, '117. is head of tin- day school where she has 
taught for three years, 314 Marlboro street, Boston. 

Grace Edgett, '97, returns to Kansas City fur a second year 
in 1 In- 1 1 igh School 1 here. 

Frances Lucas, '93, is going to India for a year and a hali i> > I" 
with her parents and take a vacation. 

Miss Mary Esther Chase. '95, of Philadelphia, President of the 
Wellesley Inn, is to be married on October r 5, in Redlands, Cali- 
fornia, to Mr. Harry Curtis Lockwood of that place. The eeiv- 
mony would have been performed at Ml. Pocano, Pa., Miss 
Chase's summer home, but for a serious accident which befell 
Mr Lockwood a short time ago. Miss Chase and members of 
her family are on their way to California. 

Invitations have been received to the wedding of Agnes 
Louise Caldwell, '96, to Mr. Charles Johnson Dunlap, on Thurs- 
day evening, October 15, in Christian Church, Shelbyville, Ken- 
tucky. 

ENGAGEME NTS A NNOUNCED. 

Miss Evelyn L. Calkins, '93-'c,4, to Mr. George Francis Brown, 
Jr., of Chicago. 

Miss Sara S. Emery, '98, to Mr. Claude N. Gilson of Wellesley 
Hills, Mass. 

Miss Lillian Favour, '94-'99, to Dr. Clarence Edson of Frank- 
lin, Mass. 

Miss Helen Lenox Street, formerly of 1900, to Rev. William 
W. Ramsey, pastor of the Park-avenue Congregational Church 
of Hartford, Conn. 

Miss Grace C. Farnham, formerly of 1902, to Mr. Guyton 
Bergazoni of Wellesley. 

B IRTH S. 

June 24. 1903, a daughter, Narcissa,to Mrs. Elizabeth Snyder 
Delano. '96.' 

. August 19, 1903, a son, Judson Gordon, to Mrs. Helen Gordon 
Harrell, '97. 

In Orizaba, Vera Cruz, Mexico, September n, 1903, a daugh- 
ter, Helen Cecilia, to Mrs. Wilhelmine Bayless Willis, formerly of 
1900. 

September 2, 1903, a daughter, Mary Louise, to Mrs. Caroline 
Williamson Montgomery, '89. 

MA RRIAG ES. 

Whitney — Dalzell. In South Egremont, Mass., Septem- 
ber 10, 1903, Miss Martha S. Dalzell to Mr. Howard Whitney. 
At home in Great Barrington, after November first. 

Sloggett — Wilcox. At Lihue, Kauai, H. I., June 3, 1903, 
Miss Lucy Etta Wilcox, 1900, to Mr. Henry Digby Sloggett. 

Hood — Eddy. At Newton, Mass., June 30, 1903, Miss Mabel 
R. Eddy, Sp. '94-'97, to Mr. Edward Clark Hood. 

Sheridan — Doonan. At Wellesley, Mass., June 30, 1903, 
Miss Elizabeth M. Doonan, '92-'93, to Mr. John H. Sheridan. 

Chase — McLean. At Haverhill, Mass., June 30, 1903, Miss 
Mary Hollands McLean, '96, to Mr. Frank Herbert Chase. 

Scott — Lyons. At Redlands, Cal., June 30, 1903, Miss Alice 
Lyons, 1902, to Mr. Donald Scott of Toledo. 



D EATH S. 

At Colorado Springs, Colorado, June, 1903, Mrs. Jennie Kenny- 
Webb, student at the College 1888-1890. 

July 5, 1903, Abbie O. Hunt, 1900. 

July 13, 1903, Philip Louis, second son of Elizabeth Blakeslee 
Tracy, '91. 

At Newton Center, Mass., August 1, 1903, M. Edith Lusk, 
I 9°3- 

August 24, 1903, Mary A. Shepard, formerly of 1903. 

At Rochester, N. Y.. September 10, 1903, Mrs. Elizabeth Me 
Guire Dodge, '94. 

In London, Septcmter 14, 1903, Mrs. Alice Gordon Gulick, 
mother of the late Frederick C. Gulick, instructor in Spanish, 
1900-1901. 



Do You Know 

Anything New in the Eating Line?" 

"Yes, HATCH'S things are simply fine. 

There are 

TURKEY FIGS, 
STUFFED FIGS, 
CRYSTALLIZED GREEN FIGS, 
STUFFED DATES, 
TURKISH DELIGHT, 

When you chance to be going by. 
Just drop in and give them a try. 





NATICK, MAii. 



Headquarters for "Wellesley 

College £eal Fob Charms 

and Pins. 

JEWELERS. 



A. SHUMAN & CO., Boston 

Ladies' Suits made by Men Tailors, Ladies' Coats, Ladies' 
Waists. Ladies' Negligee Gowns and Sacques, Ladies' Un- 
derwear, Ladies' Hosiery, Ladies' Shoes, Ladies' Gloves, 
Ladies' Complete Outfits. 

Shuman Corner, Washington and Summer Streets. 

WILLIAM LEAVENS & COii 3 ™' S? 




o 

b 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Executive Board of Student Government. 

Florence Hutsinpillar, [904, President. 
Louise Hunter, 1904, Vice-President. 
Juliet Poynter, 1905, Secretary 
Sally Reid, 1 .,05. Treasurer. ' 
Faith Talcott, 1904. 
Helen Cooke, 1905. 
El he! Sturte'vant, [906. 
Office hours-*-*- Student (government Offics 

President. 
Tuesday, 9.55-10.50. 
Thursday, 9.55-10.50. 
Saturday, 9.00-9.55. 



27 B. College Hall 



Tuesday, 11. 45-12. 30. 
Wednesday, 9.00-10.00 
Friday, 9.45-10.40. 



Vice-President. 



Loan Collection of Framed Photographs. 

Those who wish to decorate their rooms will find an attractive 
loan collection of framed photographs in the Art Building. 
These pictures representing great paintings, sculpture and views 
of English scenery are especially chosen for the purpose, and are 
carefully framed so as to make the collection as varied and 
pleasing as possible. 

The number of pictures to be taken at one time is not limited. 
They are loaned to any member of the College, either by the 
month, semester or year, thus giving an opportunity to become 
familiar with various pictures. 

A small charge is made for the rent of each picture, according 
to the length of time it is borrowed. This sum, after paying for 
the original collection forms a fund for adding new pictures. 

The Art Department is glad to consider any suggestions as to 
desirable subiects, which may be added to the collection. 

The Art Building continues to attract an increasing number 
of visitors, especially during the visiting seasons of the College 
year. 

Dviring the week from June 16th to 21st there was an average 
daily attendance of fifty-seven, the highest attendance reached 
on any one day being one- hundred and twenty. 

Wellesley College should be proud that the report of the 
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, mentions this College as heading 
the list of institutions in the number of students who visit the 
Museum freely. 

Theatrical Notes. 



Colonial Theatre — Jerome Sykes in "The Billionare." 
Tremont Theatre — "Yankee Consul." 

Hollis-street Theatre — Julia Marlowe in "Fools of Nature." 
Globe Theatre — Henrietta Crossman in "As You Like it." 
Park Theatre — "Vivian's Papas." 



HERRICK'S, 

COPLEY SQUARE, NEAR BACK BAY POST-OFFICE, 

BEST TICKETS FOR ALL THE THEATRES. 

Telephone 60S or 950. 

TLIB BAILEY, 

BANKS & 

BIDDLE COMPANY, 

Philadelphia, 



Goldsmiths, Silversmiths 

and 

Art Stationers. 



Chickerincr Pianos 

o 

The OLDEST in AMERICA : 
THE BEST in the WORLD 



Chickeri?ig &f Sons 



BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



The Wellesley Inn. 



CATERING for Table Parties and 



Spreads. 



Birthday Cakes, 30c to $1.00 



HOHE MADE CANDIES, 

Chocolate Peppermints, Fudge, Penuchi. 



S. S. PIERCE'S BOIS=BOINS. 

SWEET CHOCOLATE- 



Brooklyn Riding Academy, 

Village Square, Brookline. 

Telephone 1068-3. 
THOROUGHLY RENOVATED 



Closed Ring Again Enlarged 25 Feet. 
OPEN 8, A.M. TO lO, P.M. 

Ladies taught either on Cross Saddle or Side Saddle. First ch 
saddle horses to let. 

Finest accommodation for boarding horses. 
Fifteen minutes from Park Sq., Boston. R. CLASEN. 

Special Rales for Colleges, Schools and Teachers. 



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